About Tulsa

At DENTSPLY Tulsa Dental Specialties, we understand that endodontics is more than just a dental procedure. Clinicians like you are relieving patient pain every day, saving original teeth and improving oral health. 

Your focus on patient satisfaction drives our passion for innovation and quality. We strive to bring you proven endodontic solutions that increase your efficiency and help you achieve safe and predictable results. And we have a dedicated team of individuals who stand behind our products with the type of customer support you expect.

We love hearing from our customers. Whether you want to place an order, have a question about a product, or need help with technical issues, you can count on our customer service representatives to provide professional, courteous and knowledgeable support. We're available Monday through Friday by phone or email.

DENTSPLY Tulsa Dental Specialties wants to be your trusted partner for innovative solutions, quality products and industry news. Please contact us with your input, suggestions, and requests.

Contact By Phone

Hours of Operation: Monday - Thursday 7:30 AM to 6:00 PM and Friday 7:30 AM to 5:00 PM Central Time

Phone: Toll free in the U.S. and Canada: 1-800-662-1202 or International: 1-918-493-6598

Fax: Toll Free in the U.S. and Canada: 1-800-597-2779 or International: 1-918-493-6599

Stay In Touch

 

About My Order

Shipping & Handling, Product Availability & Backorders, Payment and Returns

Shipping and Handling

Order your products online through DENTSPLY.com and you will enjoy free ground delivery within the contiguous US. This special offer will be applied automatically to all qualifying orders – no minimum purchase, coupons or promotion codes are required. Most packages in the contiguous US will arrive in 2 to 6 business days. 

Need it in a hurry? When you purchase over $1,000 online, you will receive free second day air delivery.

Tulsa Dental ships to dental offices, clinics and schools in the 50 United States and Canada, as well as military installations with APO/FPO addresses. We're sorry, but we cannot deliver to P.O. boxes.  

Product Availability & Backorders

Unless we notify you otherwise, DENTSPLY Tulsa Dental Specialties will immediately ship all items in-stock at the time we receive your order. Any items which are currently out-of-stock will be backordered and shipped to you as soon as they are available. In the U.S. and Canada, we will not bill credit card customers shipping charges for backordered products and you will not be charged until your product ships. If you are unsure of your DENTSPLY Tulsa Dental Specialties account status regarding backorder shipments, please call 1-800-622-1202 or e-mail your account number to our Customer Service department.

Pricing & Payments

Payment Terms

We accept the following credit cards:

  • Visa®
  • MasterCard®
  • American Express®

University, Government and other customers may also purchase items on this site with alternate billing methods using their respective terms.

If you wish to pay C.O.D, you must phone 1-800-662-1202, fax 918-597-2779, or mail in your order.

Pricing Information

DENTSPLY Tulsa Dental Specialties makes every effort to ensure that all prices are correct and current. However, occasional errors may occur. If this should ever happen on a product you purchase, we will correct the pricing as quickly as possible and satisfy any concerns you may have.

Prices and items are subject to change without notice.

Returns & Exchanges

At DENTSPLY Tulsa Dental Specialties, we pride ourselves on providing the best possible customer service. Everything you order from Tulsa Dental is guaranteed with a 120-day return policy, including free shipping.

When you receive your order, please examine it carefully. If, for any reason, you are not satisfied, we have included a UPS Shipping Label (valid for 30 days) and Return Goods Form for your convenience.  Should you have any questions, please contact us at 1-800-662-1202. 

All products must be returned in new, resalable condition without any markings. All equipment must be returned unused, in the original package with seal unbroken. Claims related to shipments and orders must be reported within 30 days of invoice date.

Tulsa Dental advises to make note of the tracking number provided on your UPS Shipping Label until you have received credit for your return. Tulsa Dental is not responsible for tracking the shipment of returned items. If you are returning items purchased at a quantity discount price, the credit of these products may result in a price adjustment for products not returned.

Return Policies

Within 30 Days of Invoice

Claims related to shipments must be reported within 30 days of invoice date. Please call 1-800-662-1202 and have your invoice available for reference.

Within 120 Days of Invoice

We gladly accept products for exchange or refund within 120 days of invoice date. Product must be returned in new, resalable condition without any markings. Equipment must be returned unused, in the original package with seal unbroken. Please call 1 (800) 662-1202 for a UPS Shipping Label and have your invoice available for reference.

After 120 Days of Invoice

Products returned after 120 days of invoice must meet the standards outlined above. In addition, a 10 percent restocking fee may apply to returns 120 days after the date of original invoice. Please call 1.800.662.1202 for a UPS Shipping Label and have your invoice available for reference.

We cannot accept any product returned or exchanged after six months from the date of invoice, or products that have expired or been discontinued.

Care should be taken in packing return items to ensure that they will be received in the same condition as the original shipment. Damaged merchandise will not be accepted for return or exchange. Product authorized for return or exchange must have at least one year shelf life remaining. All returns may be subject to a restocking fee. Exchanges are not subject to a restocking fee but must be authorized within six months of the invoice date.

Return Goods Form

All returns require a Return Goods Form.

Please complete the following sections of this form:

  1. Customer information exactly as it appears on the packing slip enclosed with your order.
  2. The reason for this return.
  3. If you prefer to exchange your item(s), please list them on the 'Exchange Goods' section of the form. We will ship to the address on the original order unless you provide a different ship to address.

Please include the completed form in your package and return using the provided UPS Shipping Label.

DENTSPLY Tulsa Dental Specialties
Attn: Return Goods
608 Rolling Hills Dr.
Johnson City, TN 37604

All returns should be shipped via the UPS Shipping Label provided in each order . Shipping charges are prepaid unless otherwise instructed by Tulsa Dental Customer Service.  Tulsa Dental advises to make note of the tracking number provided on your UPS shipping label until you have received credit for your return. The type of refund will be determined by the payment method used on the original purchase.

Damaged Shipments

Please keep the original carton and take the following important steps if there appears to be shipping damage:

  • Quickly contact your delivery company (UPS) for a damage inspection report.
  • Call Tulsa Dental customer service at 1-800-662-1202 for assistance.

Other Questions

For any other returns and exchanges questions, please call us at 1-800-662-1202 Monday through Thursday, 7:30 AM to 6:00 PM, and Friday, 7:30 AM to 5:00 PM Central Time.

 

 

 

DENTSPLY Tulsa Dental Specialties (TDS) helps you stay at the forefront of your field with excellence in continuing education. 

  • Our extensive calendar of CE courses, events, live webinars, local workshops and industry forums gives you the options you need for evidence-based education, hands-on learning opportunities and CE credit. 
  • We also offer a library of free online courses, archived webinars, how-to procedure demos and peer-reviewed abstracts and articles. 
  • Our educational courses are presented by industry experts with curriculums designed to improve clinical outcomes.  We continually add new courses like our “Pathways to Success:  Endodontic Outcomes Based on Scientific Evidence.” 
  • Online registration makes it easy to get started.  DENTSPLY International is an ADA/CERP recognized provider.

The same drive that propelled you into dentistry can be fueled continuously with TDS first-class education.  The speakers you'll experience in our live and online courses are renowned educators, and are backed by the best research and presentation support in the industry.  Being an industry innovator, Tulsa Dental Specialties continually adds cutting edge topics and curriculum to our almost endless list of offerings.

Whether you seek a live lecture or hands-on clinical experience or want to absorb the latest lectures with online convenience, TDS Clinical Education has what you need.

Library


Peer-reviewed science and research behind our products and techniques.

Don't just take our word for the effectiveness of our techniques and protocols.  Take in the background and outcomes for yourself from top articles and publications.

  • The effect of the irrigant QMix on removal of canal wall smear layer: an ex vivo study

    Eliot C, Hatton JF, Stewart GP, Hildebolt CF, Jane Gillespie M, Gutmann JL. Odontology. 2013 Jan 19.

    Analysis showed all three QMix formulations were superior to EDTA in smear layer removal and exposure of dentinal tubules in the root canal system in single-rooted teeth. Full Abstract at PubMed or Full Abstract at Springer. TAGS: Smear Layer, Irrigants, QMix,

  • Comparative Analysis of Carrier-Based Obturation and Lateral Compaction: A Retrospective Clinical Outcomes Study

    Robert Hale, Robert Gatti, Gerald N. Glickman, and Lynne A. Opperman, “Comparative Analysis of Carrier-Based Obturation and Lateral Compaction: A Retrospective Clinical Outcomes Study,” International Journal of Dentistry, vol. 2012, Article ID 954675, 8 pages, 2012. doi:10.1155/2012/954675

    A new research study supports the success of obturators. A total 71 teeth in 60 patients included in the study. Patients received treatment and supervision under the Texas A&M Health Science Center/Baylor College of Dentistry pre-doctoral dental clinic from June 2008-May 2009. Full abstract TAGS: lateral compactionobturation,

  • Cyclic Fatigue and Torsional Resistance of Two New Nickel-Titanium Instruments Used in Reciprocation Motion: Reciproc Versus WaveOne.

    Kim HC, Kwak SW, Cheung GS, Ko DH, Chung SM, Lee W., J Endod. 2012 Apr;38(4):541-4. Epub 2011 Dec 23.

    The use of reciprocating movement was claimed to increase the resistance of nickel-titanium (NiTi) file to fatigue in comparison with continuous rotation. Recently 2 new brands of NiTi files have been marketed for use in a RM mode. The purpose of this study was to compare the cyclic fatigue resistance and torsional resistance of these 2 files, Reciproc and WaveOne. Full Abstract TAGS: Cyclic fatigueNickel-Titanium, WaveOneResearch Support, reciprocating

  • Alteration in the inherent metallic and surface properties of nickel-titanium root canal instruments to enhance performance, durability and safety: a focused review.

    Gutmann JL, Gao Y. Int Endod J. 2012 Feb;45(2):113-28. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2591.2011.01957.x. Epub 2011 Sep 8.

    The expanded use of nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary instruments in root canal procedures has led to the development of a wide variety of shapes, designs and applications. Root canal anatomy has not changed, however, and the same challenges exist in both initial treatment and the revision of unacceptable treatment. Full Abstract TAGS: Cyclic fatigueNickel-Titanium, Root Canal, Research Support, Cutting efficiency

  • Root canal anatomy preservation of WaveOne reciprocating files with or without glide path.

    Berutti E, Paolino DS, Chiandussi G, Alovisi M, Cantatore G, Castellucci A, Pasqualini D., J Endod. 2012 Jan;38(1):101-4. Epub 2011 Nov 13.

    This study evaluated the influence of glide path on canal curvature and axis modification after instrumentation with WaveOne Primary reciprocating files. Full Abstract TAGS: single-filecanal curvatureNickel-Titanium, glide path,Root Canal, WaveOnecastellucireciprocating

  • A quantitative and qualitative analysis of ultrasonic versus sonic endodontic systems on canal cleanliness and obturation.

    Kanter V, Weldon E, Nair U, Varella C, Kanter K, Anusavice K, Pileggi R., Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod. 2011 Dec;112(6):809-13. Epub 2011 Sep 9.

    Seventy-five extracted canines were instrumented to a size #40/0.06 taper. The EndoActivator (EA) was compared with an ultrasonic unit for final irrigation. Each unit was used for 1 minute each with 6.15% NaOCl and 17% EDTA. A control group received syringe irrigation. Thirty teeth were sectioned and evaluated for debris removal and open dentinal tubules at 3/5 mm from the apical foramen with a scanning electron microscope. Forty-five teeth were examined for obturation of lateral canals. Full Abstract TAGS: sonicUltrasonic Therapy, obturation,disinfectionIrrigants,

  • Microtomography-based comparison of reciprocating single-file F2 ProTaper technique versus rotary full sequence.

    Paqué F, Zehnder M, De-Deus G., J Endod. 2011 Oct;37(10):1394-7. Epub 2011 Aug 6.

    A preparation technique with only 1 single instrument was proposed on the basis of the reciprocating movement of the F2 ProTaper instrument. The present study was designed to quantitatively assess canal preparation outcomes achieved by this technique. Full Abstract TAGS: Rotary Systems, Root Canal, Research Support, reciprocating

  • A new noninvasive model to study the effectiveness of dentin disinfection by using confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Ma J, Wang Z, Shen Y, Haapasalo M., J Endod. 2011 Oct;37(10):1380-5. Epub 2011 Jul 30.

    The present study was designed to develop a standardized model for quantification of the effectiveness of dentin disinfection by different antibacterial solutions including a new root canal irrigant, Qmix. Centrifugation helped to create a heavy, evenly distributed infection deep into the dentinal tubules. The new model made it possible to compare the effectiveness of several disinfecting solutions in killing bacteria inside dentin by a noninvasive CLSM method. Full Abstract 

    TAGS: disinfectionNoninvasiveHaapasaloDentin, QMix,

  • Influence of root canal taper on its cleanliness: a scanning electron microscopic study.

    Arvaniti IS, Khabbaz MG., J Endod. 2011 Jun;37(6):871-4.

    Taper is a factor that determines final root canal dimensions and, consequently, the dimensions of the space for the cleaning action of irrigants. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of taper on root canal cleanliness. Full Abstract TAGS: debris removalcleanlinessRoot Canal, Research Support, taperKhabbaz

  • Lifespan of one nickel-titanium rotary file with reciprocating motion in curved root canals.

    You SY, Bae KS, Baek SH, Kum KY, Shon WJ, Lee W. J Endod. 2010 Dec;36(12):1991-4.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the lifespan of one nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary file when used in reciprocating motion and to compare the time required for its preparation of a curved root canal using both reciprocating and continuous motion. Full Abstract  TAGS: Rotary Systems, continuous motionlifespanNickel-Titanium, Root Canal, Research Support, reciprocating

  • Assessment of apically extruded debris produced by the single-file ProTaper F2 technique under reciprocating movement.

    De-Deus G, Brandão MC, Barino B, Di Giorgi K, Fidel RA, Luna AS., Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod. 2010 Sep;110(3):390-4.

    This study was designed to quantitatively evaluate the amount of dentin debris extruded from the apical foramen by comparing the conventional sequence of the ProTaper Universal nickel-titanium (NiTi) files with the single-file ProTaper F2 technique. Full Abstract TAGS: single-filedebris removalNickel-Titanium, reciprocatingdentinal debris

  • Dislocation resistance of ProRoot Endo Sealer, a calcium silicate-based root canal sealer, from radicular dentine.

    Huffman BP, Mai S, Pinna L, Weller RN, Primus CM, Gutmann JL, Pashley DH, Tay FR. Int Endod J. 2009 Jan;42(1):34-46.

    To examine the dislocation resistance of three root canal sealers from radicular dentine with and without immersion in a simulated body fluid (SBF), using a modified push-out test design that produced simulated canal spaces of uniform dimensions under identical cleaning and shaping conditions. Full abstract

    TAGS: Profile, Calcium Phosphate, Comparative Study, Randomized Controlled Trial, Endodontics, Root Canal, Research Support, Irrigants,

  • Microscopic appearance and apical seal of root canals filled with gutta-percha and ProRoot Endo Sealer after immersion in a phosphate-containing fluid.

    Weller RN, Tay KC, Garrett LV, Mai S, Primus CM, Gutmann JL, Pashley DH, Tay FR. Int Endod J. 2008 Nov;41(11):977-86.

    To investigate the sealing quality of ProRoot Endo Sealer, a calcium silicate-based sealer and its morphologic characteristics after immersion in a phosphate-containing fluid (PCF). Full abstract

    TAGS: Calcium Phosphate, Comparative Study, Zinc Oxide, Oxides, ProRoot, Randomized Controlled Trial, Endodontics, Root Canal, Research Support, Gutta-Percha, Dentin,

  • In vitro cytotoxicity evaluation of a self-adhesive, methacrylate resin-based root canal sealer.

    Pinna L, Brackett MG, Lockwood PE, Huffman BP, Mai S, Cotti E, Dettori C, Pashley DH, Tay FR. J Endod. 2008 Sep;34(9):1085-8.

    This study compared the cytotoxicity of MetaSEAL (Parkell Inc, Farmington, NY), a methacrylate resin-based sealer with an epoxy resin-based (AH Plus Jet; Dentsply Caulk, Milford, DE) and a zinc oxide-eugenol-based sealer (Pulp Canal Sealer; SybronEndo, Orange, CA). Full abstract. TAGS: Comparative Study, Endodontics, Root Canal, Research Support,

  • In vivo antibacterial efficacy of ultrasound after hand and rotary instrumentation in human mandibular molars.

    Carver K, Nusstein J, Reader A, Beck M. J Endod. 2007 Sep;33(9):1038-43. Epub 2007 Jul 20.

    The purpose of this prospective, randomized, single-blind study was to compare the in vivo antibacterial efficacy of a hand/rotary technique versus a hand/rotary/ultrasound technique in mesial root canals of necrotic mandibular molars. Full abstract. TAGS: Randomized Controlled Trial, Endodontics, Root Canal, Irrigants,

  • The in vivo evaluation of hand/rotary/ultrasound instrumentation in necrotic, human mandibular molars.

    Burleson A, Nusstein J, Reader A, Beck M. J Endod. 2007 Jul;33(7):782-7.

    This in vivo, prospective, randomized, single-blinded study histologically compared biofilm/necrotic debridement efficiency of a hand/rotary technique versus a hand/rotary/1 min ultrasound technique in the mesial roots of necrotic, human mandibular molars. The hand/rotary group consisted of 20 mesial roots. The hand/rotary/ultrasound group consisted of 20 mesial roots prepared with the same hand/rotary technique followed by 1 min of ultrasonic irrigation, per canal, utilizing an ultrasonic needle in a MiniEndo unit. Full abstract. TAGS: Endodontics, Biofilm, Root Canal, Research Support,

  • Comparison of defects in ProFile and ProTaper systems after clinical use.

    Shen Y, Cheung GS, Bian Z, Peng B. J Endod. 2006 Jan;32(1):61-5.

    The purpose of this study was to compare the incidence and mode of instrument separation of the two nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary systems that were used according to a predefined schedule of clinical use by the same group of operators. The results of this study indicated that while ProTaper was more likely to separate without warning, ProFile tended to exhibit unwinding of flutes more frequently. Full abstract.

     

    TAGS: Profile, Rotary Systems, Endodontics, Nickel-Titanium,

  • In vivo debridement efficacy of ultrasonic irrigation following hand-rotary instrumentation in human mandibular molars.

    Gutarts R, Nusstein J, Reader A, Beck M. J Endod. 2005 Mar;31(3):166-70.

    This study histologically compared the in vivo debridement efficacy of hand/rotary canal preparation versus a hand/rotary/ultrasound technique in mesial root canals of vital mandibular molars. Full abstract. TAGS: Smear Layer, Clinical Trial, Endodontics, Root Canal,

  • Morphology of the physiological foramen: I. Maxillary and mandibular molars.

    Marroquín BB, El-Sayed MA, Willershausen-Zönnchen B., J Endod. 2004 May;30(5):321-8.

    Information concerning the anatomy of the physiological foramen is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the distance between the physiological and anatomical apex, accessory foramina frequency, and the shape and diameter of the physiological foramen in maxillary and mandibular molars. The apical anatomy of 523 maxillary and 574 mandibular molars from an Egyptian population was investigated by means of a computer-aided stereomicroscope (40 x magnification). Full Abstract 

    TAGS:orphologyforamen

  • Effect of MTAD on the bond strength to enamel and dentin.

    Machnick TK, Torabinejad M, Munoz CA, Shabahang S. J Endod. 2003 Dec;29(12):818-21.

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of MTAD (a mixture of a tetracycline isomer [doxycycline], an acid [citric acid], and a detergent [Tween 80]) and phosphoric acid on the bond strength to enamel and dentin using a conventional OptiBond Solo Plus dentin adhesive system. One hundred flat surfaces (50 enamel/50 dentin) were prepared for bonding. Specimens were embedded in acrylic with the flat surface exposed. Full abstract.  TAGS: Comparative Study, MTAD, Endodontics, Root Canal, Dentin, Irrigants, 

  • Effect of MTAD on flexural strength and modulus of elasticity of dentin.

    Machnick TK, Torabinejad M, Munoz CA, Shabahang S. J Endod. 2003 Nov;29(11):747-50.

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of MTAD on the flexural strength and modulus of elasticity of dentin. Dentin bars were randomly assigned to eight groups treated with various concentrations of NaOCl (5.25%, 2.65%, 1.31%, 0.66%), 17% EDTA, MTAD, saline, or according to a clinical protocol with 1.3% NaOCl and then 5 min of MTAD. Full abstract. TAGS: GT Posts, Endodontics,

  • Evaluation of cytotoxicity of MTAD using the MTT-tetrazolium method.

    Zhang W, Torabinejad M, Li Y. J Endod. 2003 Oct;29(10):654-7.

    In this investigation we examined the cytotoxicity of MTAD compared with that of commonly used irrigants and medications. Full abstract. TAGS: Comparative Study, MTAD, Endodontics, BioPure, Root Canal, Zhang, Torabinejad, Cleanser,

  • Effect of MTAD on Enterococcus faecalis-contaminated root canals of extracted human teeth.

    Shabahang S, Torabinejad M. J Endod. 2003 Sep;29(9):576-9.

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the antimicrobial effect of MTAD (a mixture of a tetracycline isomer, an acid, and a detergent) with that of NaOCl with and without EDTA. Eighty-five extracted human teeth were contaminated with Enterococcus faecalis for 4 weeks. Full abstract. TAGS: MTAD, Endodontics, BioPure, Root Canal,

  • The antimicrobial effect of MTAD: an in vitro investigation.

    Torabinejad M, Shabahang S, Aprecio RM, Kettering JD. J Endod. 2003 Jun;29(6):400-3.

    Pulp and periradicular diseases are of microbial origin. To effectively clean the root canal system a disinfecting agent must be able to penetrate into difficult-to-reach areas and kill microorganisms with minimal damage to the host tissues. The purpose of this investigation was to test the ability of a mixture of a tetracycline isomer, an acid, and a detergent (MTAD) to kill Enterococcus faecalis and compare its efficacy to that of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Full abstract. TAGS: Comparative Study, MTAD, Endodontics, Root Canal, Irrigants,

  • In vitro antimicrobial efficacy of MTAD and sodium hypochlorite.

    Shabahang S, Pouresmail M, Torabinejad M. J Endod. 2003 Jul;29(7):450-2.

    The purpose of this study was to compare the ability of a mixture of a tetracycline isomer, an acid, and a detergent (MTAD) with that of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCI) to disinfect human root canals that had been contaminated with whole saliva. Full abstract. TAGS: Comparative Study, MTAD, Endodontics, Root Canal,
  • Quantitative analysis of the solubilizing action of MTAD, sodium hypochlorite, and EDTA on bovine pulp and dentin.

    Beltz RE, Torabinejad M, Pouresmail M. J Endod. 2003 May;29(5):334-7.

    Necrotic bovine pulp and dentin were used in this study as model tissues to represent the organic and inorganic components of the smear layer present in instrumented root canals. The capabilities of endodontic irrigants to dissolve pulverized forms of these tissues were compared. Full abstract. TAGS: Smear Layer, Comparative Study, MTAD, Root Canal, Dentin,

  • The effect of various concentrations of sodium hypochlorite on the ability of MTAD to remove the smear layer.

    Torabinejad M, Cho Y, Khademi AA, Bakland LK, Shabahang S. J Endod. 2003 Apr;29(4):233-9. Erratum in: J Endod. 2003 Jun;29(6):424.

    Various organic acids, ultrasonic instruments, and lasers have been used to remove the smear layer from the surface of instrumented root canals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of various concentrations of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) as an intracanal irrigant before the use of MTAD (a mixture of a tetracycline isomer, an acid, and a detergent) as a final rise to remove the smear layer. Full abstract. TAGS: Smear Layer, MTAD, Root Canal,

  • A new solution for the removal of the smear layer.

    Torabinejad M, Khademi AA, Babagoli J, Cho Y, Johnson WB, Bozhilov K, Kim J, Shabahang S. J Endod. 2003 Mar;29(3):170-5.

    Various organic acids, ultrasonic instruments, and lasers have been used to remove the smear layer from the surface of instrumented root canals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a mixture of a tetracycline isomer, an acid, and a detergent (MTAD) as a final rinse on the surface of instrumented root canals. FULL ABSTRACT. TAGS: Smear Layer, MTAD, Root Canal,

  • A comparison of apical sealing and extrusion between Thermafil and lateral condensation techniques.

    Abarca AM, Bustos A, Navia M. J Endod. 2001 Nov;27(11):670-2.

    Forty curved canals from 20 mesial roots of extracted human mandibular molars were instrumented (Profile .04) using a crown-down technique and divided into two groups. The experimental group was obturated using the Thermafil technique and the control group was obturated using the lateral condensation technique. Full abstract. TAGS: Endodontics, Membrane, Thermafil, Peptide Fragments,

  • Finishing the apical one third. Endodontic considerations.

    Ruddle CJ. Dent Today. 2002 May;21(5):66-70, 72-3.

    University of the Pacific, School of Dentistry, San Francisco, USA. Full abstract. TAGS: Endodontics, Root Canal, Irrigants, 

  • Comparison of 6 different gutta-percha techniques (part II): Thermafil, JS Quick-Fill, Soft Core, Microseal, System B, and lateral condensation.

    Gençoğlu N. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod. 2003 Jul;96(1):91-5.

    In this in vitro study, the core-to-sealer ratios were calculated for 6 different gutta-percha techniques: Thermafil, JS Quick-Fill, Soft Core, Microseal, System B, and lateral condensation. The core consisted of gutta-percha or gutta-percha and carrier. Full abstract. TAGS: Comparative Study, Endodontics, Root Canal, Gutta-Percha,

  • In vitro apical leakage of system B compared with other filling techniques.

    Pommel L, Camps J. J Endod. 2001 Jul;27(7):449-51.

    A fluid filtration system was used to compare the apical microleakage of roots filled with the system B (Analytic Technology), single-cone technique, lateral condensation, vertical condensation, and Thermafil (Caulk-Dentsply). Full abstract. TAGS: Profile, Comparative Study, Randomized Controlled Trial, Clinical Trial, Endodontics, Root Canal, Thermafil,

  • Lack of correlation among three methods for evaluation of apical leakage.

    Pommel L, Jacquot B, Camps J. J Endod. 2001 May;27(5):347-50.

    The purpose of this study was to compare three methods of evaluation of the apical seal. Thirty-six teeth were prepared with a ProFile device and filled according to three filling methods: Thermafil (n = 12), warm vertical condensation (n = 12), and the single cone technique (n = 2). The apical seal was recorded with three methods, each successively used on the same teeth: a fluid filtration method, an electrochemical method, and a dye penetration study. Full abstract. TAGS: Comparative Study, Endodontics, Root Canal,

  • Effects of four Ni-Ti preparation techniques on root canal geometry assessed by micro computed tomography.

    Peters OA, Schönenberger K, Laib A. Int Endod J. 2001 Apr;34(3):221-30.

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of four preparation techniques on canal volume and surface area using three-dimensionally reconstructed root canals in extracted human maxillary molars. In addition, micro CT data was used to describe morphometric parameters related to the four preparation techniques. Full abstract. TAGS: Comparative Study, Endodontics, Nickel-Titanium, Root Canal, Dentin,

  • The influence of surface configuration on the retention of posts designed for use with a cast-on technique.

    Rosin M, Fleissner P, Welk A, Steffen H, Heine B. Quintessence Int. 2001 Feb;32(2):119-30.

    The combination of an individually cast core and a prefabricated metal post is one of the many techniques to restore endodontically treated teeth. The surface characteristics of commercially available posts vary considerably and likely influence retention. In this study, the surface configuration of 11 castable prefabricated post systems and their retention at the post-cement interface were investigated. Full abstract. TAGS: Comparative Study, Zinc Phosphate Cement, Prosthesis, GT Posts, Endodontics,

  • Effect of different surface textures on retentive strength of tapered posts. 

    Nergiz I, Schmage P, Platzer U, McMullan-Vogel CG. J Prosthet Dent. 1997Nov;78(5):451-7.

    Tapered posts allow for the preservation of tooth substance in the fragile apical area and are advantageous in clinical situations where they conform to the root and canal configuration of endodontically treated teeth. However, their lower retention compared with passive parallel-sided or active threaded posts is a disadvantage. This study determined the retentive strength of tapered titanium posts with different surface textures and examined the effect of roughening dentinal walls of the prepared post space. Full abstract. TAGS: GT Posts, Endodontics,

  • Histologic assessment of mineral trioxide aggregate as a root-end filling in monkeys. 

    Torabinejad M, Pitt Ford TR, McKendry DJ, Abedi HR, Miller DA, Kariyawasam SP. J Endod. 1997 Apr;23(4):225-8.

    Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) has been shown in a number of experiments to be a potential root-end filling material. The purpose of this study was to examine the periradicular tissue response of monkeys to MTA and amalgam as root-end fillings. Full abstract. TAGS: Comparative Study, Oxides, Endodontics, Root Canal, MTA,

  • Microendodontic analysis of failure: identifying missed canals.

    Ruddle C. Dent Today. 1997 Jan;16(1):52, 54, 56-7.

    Full abstract. TAGS: Ultrasonic Therapy, Endodontics, Case Reports, Root Canal,
  • Investigation of mineral trioxide aggregate for root-end filling in dogs.

    Torabinejad M, Hong CU, Lee SJ, Monsef M, Pitt Ford TR. J Endod. 1995 Dec;21(12):603-8.

    Numerous compounds have been used as root-end filling materials. Based on the results of in vitro and intraosseous implantation tests, mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) seems to have potential as a root-end filling material. The purpose of this study was to examine the periradicular tissue response of dogs to MTA and amalgam. Full abstract. TAGS: Comparative Study, Oxides, Endodontics, Root Canal, Dental Amalgam,

  • Comparative investigation of marginal adaptation of mineral trioxide aggregate and other commonly used root-end filling materials.

    Torabinejad M, Smith PW, Kettering JD, Pitt Ford TR. J Endod. 1995 Jun;21(6):295-9.

    This study investigated the marginal adaptation of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as a root-end filling material, compared with commonly used root-end filling materials by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Full abstract. TAGS: Comparative Study, Zinc Oxide, Oxides, Endodontics, Root Canal, Dental Amalgam, 

  • Bacterial leakage of mineral trioxide aggregate as a root-end filling material.

    Torabinejad M, Rastegar AF, Kettering JD, Pitt Ford TR. J Endod. 1995 Mar;21(3):109-12.

    Previous dye leakage studies have shown that mineral trioxide aggregate leaks significantly less than other commonly used root-end filling materials. This study determined the time needed for Staphylococcus epidermidis to penetrate a 3-mm thickness of amalgam, Super-EBA, Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM), or mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as root-end filling materials. Full abstract. TAGS: Comparative Study, Endodontics, Root Canal,

  • An in-vitro evaluation of the influence of canal curvature on the sealing ability of Thermafil. 

    Leung SF, Gulabivala K. Int Endod J. 1994 Jul;27(4):190-6.

    The sealing ability of lateral condensation and Thermafil were compared in root canals with curvatures either greater or less than 25 degrees. It was found that Thermafil sealed significantly better than lateral condensation in canals with curvatures greater than 25 degrees (P < 0.05). However, there were no significant differences between the techniques in the groups with canal curvature less than 25 degrees. There was no significant difference in the performance of each of the techniques when analysed with respect to canal curvature. Full abstract. TAGS: Endodontics, Root Canal, Thermafil,

  • Removal of fractured instruments using a combined automated/ultrasonic technique.

    Hülsmann M. J Endod. 1994 Mar;20(3):144-7.

    Removal of fractured instruments is one of the most difficult operative procedures in endodontics. Although a number of different devices and techniques have been developed, none are successful in all cases. An additional technique using an automated device (Canal Finder System) for bypassing and an ultrasonic device for loosening and retrieval of fractured instruments is presented. The rationale for this technique is described and illustrated by two clinical cases. Full abstract. TAGS: Ultrasonic Therapy, Endodontics, Case Reports, Root Canal,

  • Sealing ability of a mineral trioxide aggregate when used as a root end filling material.

    Torabinejad M, Watson TF, Pitt Ford TR. J Endod. 1993 Dec;19(12):591-5.

    This in vitro study used rhodamine B fluorescent dye and a confocal microscope to evaluate the sealing ability of amalgam, super EBA, and a mineral trioxide aggregate when used as root end filling materials. Full abstract. TAGS: Comparative Study, Oxides, Endodontics, Root Canal, Dental Amalgam,

  • Sealing ability of a mineral trioxide aggregate for repair of lateral root perforations.

    Lee SJ, Monsef M, Torabinejad M. J Endod. 1993 Nov;19(11):541-4.

    Amalgam, IRM, and a mineral trioxide aggregate were tested for repair of experimentally created root perforations. Fifty sound, extracted mandibular and maxillary molars were used in this study. Full abstract. TAGS: Comparative Study, Zinc Oxide, Oxides, Endodontics, Root Canal, Dental Amalgam,

  • A assessment of the plastic Thermafil obturation technique. Part 1. Radiographic evaluation of adaptation and placement.

    Gutmann JL, Saunders WP, Saunders EM, Nguyen L. Int Endod J. 1993 May;26(3):173-8

    .Adaptation and placement of alpha-phase gutta-percha delivered with a plastic core-carrier, Thermafil, was compared to the lateral condensation of gutta-percha in a specific tooth model. Full abstract. TAGS: Randomized Controlled Trial, Clinical Trial, Endodontics, Root Canal, Research Support, Gutta-Percha,

  • Comparison of different gutta-percha root filling techniques: Thermafil, Quick-Fill, System-B, and lateral condensation

    Gençoğlu N, Garip Y, Baş M, Samani S. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod. 2002 Mar;93(3):333-6.

    In this in vitro study, the core (gutta-percha or gutta-percha and carrier)/sealer ratio and the sealing ability were calculated for 4 different gutta-percha techniques: Thermafil, JS Quick-Fill, System B, and lateral condensation. Full abstract. TAGS: Comparative Study, Endodontics, Root Canal, Thermafil,

  • Comparison of retentive properties of four post systems.

    Cohen BI, Musikant BL, Deutsch AS. J Prosthet Dent. 1992 Aug;68(2):264-8.

    This study compared the retention of posts in the root for various diameters (1.3 mm and 1.6 mm) of three prefabricated post systems (Unity, Filpost, and Brasseler) with that of the previously reported No. 1 and No. 2 Flexi-Post systems. The experiment was divided into three groups comprising 10 samples for each post system studied. Full abstract. TAGS: Zinc Phosphate Cement, GT Posts, Endodontics, Root Canal,

  • A comparison of strains generated during placement of five endodontic posts.

    Ross RS, Nicholls JI, Harrington GW. J Endod. 1991 Sep;17(9):450-6.

    Twenty-five extracted human maxillary central incisors were randomly divided into five equal groups. Crowns were removed 1 mm incisal to the cementoenamel junction. Endodontic treatment was carried out and each tooth was affixed with two strain gauges. The strain gauge wires were connected to a Wheatstone Bridge circuit. Each group of five teeth was restored with either a Para-Post Plus (the control post), Flexi-Post, Vlock post, Kurer Fin Lock Anchor, or a Radix Anchor. Full abstract. TAGS: Comparative Study, GT Posts, Clinical Trial, Research Support,

  • Effect of post adaptation on fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth.

    Sorensen JA, Engelman MJ. J Prosthet Dent. 1990 Oct;64(4):419-24.

    This study determined the effect of different post designs and varying amounts of post-to-canal adaptation on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth. Full abstract.  TAGS: Zinc Phosphate Cement, GT Posts, Endodontics, Root Canal, 

  • Orthograde ultrasonic retrieval of root canal obstructions.

    Chenail BL, Teplitsky PE. J Endod. 1987 Apr;13(4):186-90.

    Full abstract. TAGS: Ultrasonic Therapy, Endodontics, Root Canal,
  • An evaluation of post length within the elastic limits of dentin.

    Leary JM, Aquilino SA, Svare CW. J Prosthet Dent. 1987 Mar;57(3):277-81.

    Posted teeth were evaluated to determine the reinforcement capabilities of various post lengths. The results suggest that as internal tooth structure is removed from the tooth the tooth becomes weaker, that teeth with posts do show more reinforcement than nonposted teeth with the same manipulation characteristics, and that some load transfer appears to exist with cemented posts. Full abstract. TAGS: GT Posts, Endodontics,
  • Ultrasonic removal of broken instruments in root canals.

    Nagai O, Tani N, Kayaba Y, Kodama S, Osada T. Int Endod J. 1986 Nov;19(6):298-304.

    Full abstract. TAGS: Endodontics, Root Canal,
  • Endodontic treatment of root canals obstructed by foreign objects.

    Fors UG, Berg JO. Int Endod J. 1986 Jan;19(1):2-10.

    Full abstract. TAGS: Endodontics, Root Canal,
  • The Dentatus screw: comparative stress analysis with other endodontic dowel designs.

    Standlee JP, Caputo AA, Holcomb JP. J Oral Rehabil. 1982 Jan;9(1):23-33. Full abstract. TAGS: Crowns, GT Posts, Endodontics,

  • The retentive and stress-distributing properties of a threaded endodontic dowel. 

    Standlee JP, Caputo AA, Holcomb J, Trabert KC. J Prosthet Dent.1980 Oct;44(4):398-404.

    When the Radix Anchor apex was allowed to engage the bottom of the prepared channel, very high apical stresses were generated within the supporting structure. When the coronal flanges engaged the occlusal portion of the model, high lateral stresses occurred in the coronal portion of the channel. These stress concentrations can be avoided by installing the dowel so that only the retentive threads engage dentin. Full abstract. TAGS: Zinc Phosphate Cement, Crowns, GT Posts, Endodontics,

  • Adaptation of threaded dowels to dentin.

    Zmener O. J Prosthet Dent. 1980 May;43(5):530-5.

    Adaptation of threaded dowels to the walls of the canals is minimal in the cervical third and maximal in the apical third. Each of the three types of dowels may cause lateral stresses and possibly fracture. Matched reamers and dowels reduce the danger of fracture. Smaller-diameter dowels maintain less contact with the dentin and avoid weakening the root. The Kurer Anchor system provided a satisfactory combination of nonlateral residual stresses which protected the root from complications. Full abstract. TAGS: Crowns, GT Posts, Endodontics,

  • The influence of surface roughness on the retentive ability of two dental luting cements.

    Oilo G, Jørgensen KD. J Oral Rehabil. 1978 Oct;5(4):377-89.

    Two series of brass cones and two series of dentine posts with varying surface roughness were produced. Maximum roughness value and arithmetical mean roughness were recorded for each cone. Brass crowns were cemented either with zinc phosphate cement (De Trey's zinc Cenment Improved) or with polycarboxylate cement (Durelon). A tensile stress was applied until the crown and the cone separated. The retentive force in relation to retention area was measured. Full abstract. TAGS: Zinc Phosphate Cement, GT Posts, Endodontics,

  • Analysis of stress distribution by endodontic posts.

    Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol. 1972 Jun;33(6):952-60. Standlee JP, Caputo AA, Collard EW, Pollack MH. Full abstract. TAGS: Crowns, GT Posts, Endodontics, Root Canal, Occlusion,

  • Retention of endodontic dowels: effects of cement, dowel length, diameter, and design.

    Standlee JP, Caputo AA, Hanson EC. J Prosthet Dent. 1978 Apr;39(4):400-5.

    The retentive capacity of three preformed endodontic dowel designs was compared at two lengths and two diameters, with three different cements. The greatest single factor influencing retention of these devices was the design used. Full abstract. TAGS: GT Posts, Endodontics, 

Patents

DENTSPLY Tulsa Dental Specialties has a long history of innovation in dentistry. Here is a partial list of current U.S. patents and the products they apply to.

Product Patents
BioPure MTAD 7,238,342 B2
Endoactivator 7,261,561
GT hand files 6,106,296, 5,897,316, 5,921,775, 5,842,861, 5,836,764
GT, GT Series X rotary files 6,106,296, 5,897,316, 5,921,775, 5,842,861
GuttaCore obturators 5,833,457
NiTi Spreaders & Explorers 5,624,259
ProFile File Cleaner 6,877,984
ProFile ISO, ProFile Series 29 rotary files 6,106,296
ProPex II 6,425,875
ProPosts 5,636,991, 5,947,659, 5,409,377
ProRoot MTA 5,769,638
ProTaper NEXT rotary files 5,658,145, 5,746,597, 6,942,484, 7,955,078, 7,648,599
ProTaper Universal rotary files 5,658,145, 5,746,597
ProUltra Ultrasonic Endo Tips 5,868,570, 5,704,787, 5,836,765
Thermafil Plus Plastic, ProTaper Universal, ProTaper NEXT, 
GT, GT Series X, Vortex obturators
5,833,457
ThermaSeal Plus sealer 5,624,976
Vortex, Vortex Blue rotary files 7,270,541
WaveOne reciprocating file 6,293,795, 7,648,599
X-Tip 6,287,114

 

Welcome, Tulsa Dental Specialties Customers

We’re glad you’re here. Because now, all the innovative products and helpful CE courses from DENTSPLY Tulsa Dental Specialties are available here, along with other DENTSPLY products at DENTSPLY.com. That means you can purchase a full range of DENTSPLY products and courses with just one shopping cart. Plus, get free shipping (2nd Day Air Only) on endodontic product orders $1,000 and up.

Returning Customers

If you previously registered on TulsaDentalSpecialties.com, you only have to reset your password by following these easy steps.

  1. At the top, right of any page, click Login.
  2. Near the bottom of the login pop-up that appears, you’ll see the following message: Welcome Tulsa Dental customers. If this is your first time at this site, please reset your password.  Click on that link.
  3. Enter your email address associated with your account and click Send.
  4. Our system will send you an email to verify the email address is valid, safeguarding the account.
  5. If you are given the response "User with specified Email cannot be found. Please check specified email address.", you will need to register as new.
  6. Otherwise, click the link in the email.  It will bring you back to this site to set your password.
  7. All of your information from your TulsaDentalSpecialties.com account will be carried over to DENTSPLY.com.

Current Customer Log In 1

How to Register a New Account

If you are a customer of Tulsa, but never registered on TulsaDentalSpecialties.com, then start here.

          1. At the top, right of any page, click Register.

2. Fill out the form and click Register at the bottom

    a. To ensure we set up your account correctly, we ask that you provide us with 1.) The primary email address for ordering purposes (as this cannot be changed at a later date), and 2.) the practice address requesting to ship to.  

    b. Set and confirm your password.

    c. A separate billing address, or additional shipping addresses, can be added as soon as you register, or later if needed.

    d. License and NPI numbers are listed as optional, but are necessary for new Endodontic accounts. If these are left blank, a Customer Service Representative will contact you for this information.

3. After you click Register on the form, our system will send you a confirmation email. This allows us to verify the email address is valid, safeguarding the account.

    --If you receive the message "The Login has already been registered", please use the Reset Your Password link at Login rather than registering new.

4. Click the link in the email. It will bring you back to this site to finish submitting your request for an account.

5. At this point, your request for an account is complete. Within 48 hours, our staff will research the request to finalize the account.

6. You will be able to log into your account and order distributor products immediately. When the "Call" button on Tulsa Dental Specialties products changes to "Add to Basket (image of shopping cart)", you will be ready to add Tulsa Dental Specialties products to your basket.

New User Reg Page

I was registered on the old website, do I need to re-register?

Already registered on TulsaDentalSpecialties.com? All you need to do is reset your password. For step-by-step instructions, click here.

I’m new to ordering Tulsa Dental Specialties supplies online, how do I register?

Here’s how to set up a new Office Account.

I didn’t receive an activation email or was locked out of my account, how do I activate my account?

If you are having technical problems logging into the site, please email us at: tulsacustserv@dentsply.com or call 1-800-662-1202. 

Why can’t I log into the website?

There are 3 key things that can stop you from logging into the website.

1.) Wrong username: Not using an email address, turning caps lock on or a typo.

2.) Wrong password: turning on/off caps lock, forgetting your password or a typo. 

3.) Wrong website.  U.S. Site OR Canada Site

Dentsply.com displays a different website for each country. When you go to Dentsply.com, the site detects where you are located and when it loads, it takes you to the correct country site based on your location.  Your login only works in the country where you live.

If you are still having trouble logging in, please contact us at: tulsacustserv@dentsply.com or 1-800-662-1202.

I have different billing and shipping addresses or I have multiple offices. How do I get both on the website?

When you register on the website, the site assumes billing and shipping are the same address.

Register on the website using your main shipping address at first.  

You will be able to access account information, edit billing addresses, and edit and add new shipping addresses as soon as you are logged into your account.

After registration is complete, go to the My Account Page. On the left hand side is the menu.  Your billing and shipping addresses are under My Addresses.

What do I do if I want my employees to be able to log in to my account?

Dentsply.com gives you control of who can log into your account.  You are able to add additional users and limit their access level yourself.

On My Account page menu, If Manage User Access is greyed out, then you are logged in as a “member.” If Manage User Access is blue, you are logged in with “manager” access. Members cannot add/edit credit cards, addresses, or manage users.  Managers control the entire account.   

Can I ship to other addresses?

You now have more control over shipping on Dentsply.com. 

  • You can add any shipping address to an account from the My Account page.
  • You can also request a shipping address at the time of checkout.
  • We cannot ship to a PO Box.

There are a few places DENTSPLY Tulsa Dental Specialties can’t ship to, such as freight forwarding companies, Puerto Rico, or anywhere else outside the U.S. and Canada. You will be contacted if your order cannot be shipped to the requested address. 

How do I change my password?

To change your password, go to the My Accounts page and then go to the Personal Info page.  On the right side of the page you can click on Change Password with guidance on what combinations are allowed.

I put in a credit card last time, why wasn’t it saved?

On DENTSPLY.com, credit cards can be entered for one-time use at checkout, or they can be entered on the My Account page to be kept on file.  If you entered your credit card information at checkout, the website does not save the card for future use. 

If My Account says I’m set to invoice, why do I have to enter a credit card at checkout?

The credit card field is there for your convenience.  If you are already set up as an invoice customer, the system will recognize you as such and allow you to bypass that field.

If your Tulsa Dental Specialties account is set up for invoicing, but you are still required to enter a credit card, please contact Customer Service at 1-800-662-1202.

If you would like to request invoice billing, please contact Customer Service at 1-800-662-1202.

Why can’t I find what I’m looking for on the website?

If you are having difficulty locating products on the site there are different ways to search:

  • Search by keyword in the Search window at the top of every page. (See question above for tips)
  • Mouse over the drop-down Endodontics menu at the top of every page.
  • Fill out the Quick Order Form which has a link at the top of every page.
  • Go to your Favorites list on the My Account page, OR
  • Click on the Reuse Order button when viewing past orders.

If the item is still missing, please contact customer service @ 1-800-662-1202.

Why is the website showing the wrong price?

Prices can only be seen once you have registered on the site. The "Call" button will change to "Add to Basket".  If, after you register, you are still receiving the incorrect price or seeing the "Call" button, please contact customer service @ 1-800-662-1202. 

The website says Unavailable (or limited) availability.  What does that mean?

When looking at a product, one way to tell if the item is available is the In-Stock indicator shown next to the item.  When the item is in full stock, the indicator is green.  When the item’s stock is getting low, the indicator will turn yellow and say Limited.  A red Indicator means that the item is out of stock and currently unavailable. If you would like to know when the item will be available, please call customer service.   

How do I add items to my cart?

Simply locate the item you wish to purchase, then click the "Add to Basket (image of cart)" button.  

The item will be waiting for you in your basket upon checkout.

Why won’t the website let me check out?

When adding to, or changing your basket, the green Check Out button will change to Recalculate.  The top of the screen will still show the Checkout link next to the Quick Order and Basket links. 

The Checkout link won’t work until you either leave the Basket page, or click on the Recalculate button at the bottom of the Basket page. 

I clicked Place Order, but nothing happened. What do I do?

If you have no credit card on file, or select Add Credit Card for Payment Method, there is a small link at the bottom of the credit card form that applies the card to the order and closes the form.

If you have not clicked Save, but click Place Order the screen will give a small error message at the top of the screen saying, “Please add at least one card”.

If you have invalid information in any field for the credit card or the Shipping Address, a tiny red exclamation point will appear next to the invalid information and an error bar will appear at the top of the screen for about 5 seconds. 

How can I view my order’s sales tax?

Sales Tax is not calculated on Dentsply.com.  Once your order is shipped and our systems invoice the order, sales tax will show in your order history.   

If I forgot something on my order, or put the wrong address, or wrong credit card, can I edit it?

If you need to change your order, please contact customer service immediately at 1-800-662-1202.

How can I view my order?

Click My Account on the top right of any page. From this page, you can view your order history, check status of an order, and much more.

How do I register for a CE Course?

Registration for live webinars, recorded webinars, and live courses is available through the "Education" area near the top of all pages. You may browse by speaker, courses, or area of interest (ie: Endodontics, Implants, etc). If you click on the title of the course, you are able to view all the information about that course. You may enroll directly from that screen.

If you have any questions regarding registration, please contact customer service at 1-800-662-1202.